Ming’s Musings: What I’m Reading 9/21-9/25

Monday: Student learning accounts for half of teacher evaluations this year

Local article from my area that talks about the 50% value on student growth for teacher evaluations. This is an especially difficult situation for teachers and the evaluators alike in that the state, through legislation, has said that this is the law, but has not adequately defined what student growth is. To think that 50% of your evaluation is required by law to involve a variable that the state has difficulty defining is a difficult situation for all parties involved. Evaluations are not supposed to be punitive, but rather a measurement of where somebody is and what they can improve on.

Tuesday: Teens Need More Sleep, But Districts Struggle to Shift Start Times

The major point of the article is that school should start later in the day, especially at the high school level. Research points toward high school students optimally starting after 9am, but this poses a logistical issue for many families.

Being someone who has been involved with high school education for 11 years, I can attest to the observation that teenagers have a tough time functioning early in the morning and have noticed how much better those same students do in the afternoon. The article takes the viewpoint, however, that schools are not aware of the benefit of starting later, which is false. Educators are aware of the benefits of the teenage mind starting later in the day, but cost (though we wish it weren’t) is a driving factor in many school decisions. Fundamentally, everything from busing, to teacher contracts, to after school activities (including sports) would need to be changed in order for this to be beneficial. The difficult ask with this type of proposal is that it almost requires an entire community to alter their schedule for the schools and that seems to be too big of a reach in most areas.

Wednesday: Grand Rapids schools teacher layoffs spark evaluation system discussion

Another article, this one out of Grand Rapids, about the effect of teacher evaluations. The article brings up that multiple probationary teachers were released from a district due to not achieving effective status on their evaluation. The troubling part of the article for me is that the point was made that school data is used for student growth for the teachers that teach subjects that are not directly state tested, often times when teachers didn’t teach those students. This is an example of how the failure of the state to define student growth has led to dire outcomes. Another part of the article that was bothersome to me is that one of the board members, that was a former teacher and administrator, claimed a lack of consistency in the year-to-year evaluations citing his own record of being highly effective one year and effective the next. In the education world, as in many other professions, there are up years and down years that are determined by many different factors. It is not a fair claim to say that the evaluator or evaluation system is unjust based on the information provided.

Thursday: Judge rules Ann Arbor school district can ban guns

A short article about Ann Arbor schools and a court case that upheld the right of the school district to ban guns on school property.

I am not against denying anyone their rights that have been granted by our Constitution. With that being said, however, I do not see having guns on school grounds as a good thing. Any gun, whether properly licensed or not, poses a security concern at the very least.

Friday: Five ‘dumb’ things one educator used to think but doesn’t anymore

Interesting take on five topics that have undoubtedly come up in classrooms across the country. “1. School is your job. Just like I have a job and your parents have a job, you too have a job. 2. Algebra teaches you how to think differently. 3. Homework will teach you how to do things you don’t want to do. 4. My strict deadlines are teaching them accountability and responsibility. 5. Difficult/strict teachers help you learn how to deal with those types of people…it’s good for you.

I really enjoyed how the author reflected on his experiences as an educator and challenge the conventional logic above. Anybody that has been in education will tell you that it is cyclical and that there are no new ideas. I don’t believe that this has to be the case if more people challenge why we do what we do. My thoughts on education have changed a great deal over my career and are now reflected in my simple philosophy of creating opportunities. Education should be exciting and learning should be fun while opening doors to areas that otherwise may have been blocked off.

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