Ming’s Musings: What I’m reading 10/12-10/16

Monday: Obama administration: More support, fewer suspensions for kids who miss too much school

The article expresses a concern on the part of the administration that chronically absent students are being suspended and in some cases expelled. The shocking statistic provided is that 5-7.5 millions students per year have chronic absenteeism, missing 10% or more of the school year. I agree on a certain level with keeping students at school and not suspending them. The suggestions offered of finding the reason for the absence and providing guidance are both things that schools are already doing. This support, however, is also something that has been cut from budgets across the country as belts are tightened. I’ve mentioned before, and I will say it again, we need to address the root of the problems that we observe. It is a near impossible task to provide all that is asked of schools with less dollars and personnel to do so.

Tuesday:  12 Little Known Laws Of Mindfulness (That Will Change Your Life)

This one got caught up in my Pocket account for me to read later, which I finally got around to. I am pick on reading self help articles that give you a different outlook on your life. I liked the 12 suggestions in the article and found one resonate with my particularly well, “When you try to control too much, you enjoy too little”. This one struck a chord with me as I am in a position of control of a lot of elements. This year, with athletics I have tried to give some of that control back to my coaches and am feeling much happier. The other sticking point from the article is that, “Your only reality is THIS MOMENT, right here, right now.” These two takeaways combined have left me with the mentality that I need to try harder to control less and enjoy the now around me. Sometimes when you plan to much you forget to reap the happiness and benefits of that hard work. I will try not to let that happen to me anymore.

Wednesday: Guns in Michigan churches? Bars? Schools? Maybe

Scary legislation has hit the Senate floor that concealed weapons will be allowed in schools, bars, and churches where only open carry had been allowed previously. The article references the recent Community College shooting in Oregon and how firearm carriers DID NOT respond, and how a suspected shoplifter was fired upon in Ann Arbor by someone with a concealed license. These are two prime examples of what could negatively happen as a result of this law passing. Guns have no place in schools.

Thursday: Ex-Detroit principal to plead guilty in bribery probe

Sad article about an embezzlement case taking place in a Detroit high school that has been part of the state reform district of the EAA. It seems that one of the principals is pleading guilty of stealing close to $60k. Articles like this reveal the difficult nature of education in Detroit. The part that bothers me the most is that things like this are happening in the city while they amass more and more debt and do not effectively turn schools around. This combined with the plea from Detroit for the state to bail out their debt at the detriment of all the other districts across the state is troubling at best but sickening at worst.

Friday: World-famous teacher files $1 billion lawsuit against Los Angeles schools to end ‘teacher jail’

Continuing the theme of this week of the sad reality in schools, a nationally awarded and world recognized teacher from LA has filed a class action lawsuit against his former district. The root of the dispute that lead to his dismissal was a joke made in the classroom with his students that was reported and landed him in teacher purgatory, a place they have you go while being investigated. This article typifies the growing rift between society and educators and the rising tensions that are coming about as a result. This is a high profile case, but certainly not the only one out there and shows how closely scrutinized educators are and the unrealistic expectations placed on people that work with children. One could argue that the lack of respect and trust, constant criticism, and governmental tinkering have made every classroom a “teacher jail” of sorts.

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