Tag Archives: laws

Ming’s Musings: What I’m reading 10/12-10/16

Monday: Obama administration: More support, fewer suspensions for kids who miss too much school

The article expresses a concern on the part of the administration that chronically absent students are being suspended and in some cases expelled. The shocking statistic provided is that 5-7.5 millions students per year have chronic absenteeism, missing 10% or more of the school year. I agree on a certain level with keeping students at school and not suspending them. The suggestions offered of finding the reason for the absence and providing guidance are both things that schools are already doing. This support, however, is also something that has been cut from budgets across the country as belts are tightened. I’ve mentioned before, and I will say it again, we need to address the root of the problems that we observe. It is a near impossible task to provide all that is asked of schools with less dollars and personnel to do so.

Tuesday:  12 Little Known Laws Of Mindfulness (That Will Change Your Life)

This one got caught up in my Pocket account for me to read later, which I finally got around to. I am pick on reading self help articles that give you a different outlook on your life. I liked the 12 suggestions in the article and found one resonate with my particularly well, “When you try to control too much, you enjoy too little”. This one struck a chord with me as I am in a position of control of a lot of elements. This year, with athletics I have tried to give some of that control back to my coaches and am feeling much happier. The other sticking point from the article is that, “Your only reality is THIS MOMENT, right here, right now.” These two takeaways combined have left me with the mentality that I need to try harder to control less and enjoy the now around me. Sometimes when you plan to much you forget to reap the happiness and benefits of that hard work. I will try not to let that happen to me anymore.

Wednesday: Guns in Michigan churches? Bars? Schools? Maybe

Scary legislation has hit the Senate floor that concealed weapons will be allowed in schools, bars, and churches where only open carry had been allowed previously. The article references the recent Community College shooting in Oregon and how firearm carriers DID NOT respond, and how a suspected shoplifter was fired upon in Ann Arbor by someone with a concealed license. These are two prime examples of what could negatively happen as a result of this law passing. Guns have no place in schools.

Thursday: Ex-Detroit principal to plead guilty in bribery probe

Sad article about an embezzlement case taking place in a Detroit high school that has been part of the state reform district of the EAA. It seems that one of the principals is pleading guilty of stealing close to $60k. Articles like this reveal the difficult nature of education in Detroit. The part that bothers me the most is that things like this are happening in the city while they amass more and more debt and do not effectively turn schools around. This combined with the plea from Detroit for the state to bail out their debt at the detriment of all the other districts across the state is troubling at best but sickening at worst.

Friday: World-famous teacher files $1 billion lawsuit against Los Angeles schools to end ‘teacher jail’

Continuing the theme of this week of the sad reality in schools, a nationally awarded and world recognized teacher from LA has filed a class action lawsuit against his former district. The root of the dispute that lead to his dismissal was a joke made in the classroom with his students that was reported and landed him in teacher purgatory, a place they have you go while being investigated. This article typifies the growing rift between society and educators and the rising tensions that are coming about as a result. This is a high profile case, but certainly not the only one out there and shows how closely scrutinized educators are and the unrealistic expectations placed on people that work with children. One could argue that the lack of respect and trust, constant criticism, and governmental tinkering have made every classroom a “teacher jail” of sorts.

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Ming’s Musings: 10/5-10/9

Monday: Duggan steps into the breach to save Detroit schools

Article touches upon the mayor of Detroit’s plan to do his part in helping Detroit schools. I like the approach that he expresses in that he will lobby for the schools but will not take them over; he will leave that in the hands of people better qualified to run the schools. I also like that he recognizes that Detroit is a powerful test subject and that if we can get things right with DPS then we can apply those same principles to other struggling school districts. The part that I am not on board with is written between the lines. I am not in favor of legislation that would require other areas around the state to pay for the debts created by the EAA and DPS.

Tuesday: How much do big education nonprofits pay their bosses? Quite a bit, it turns out.

This article questions the tax exempt status of major testing corporations such as those responsible for the SAT and the ACT and the overall salary of the top executives. The numbers are eye-opening though, especially in light of the big state contracts that these companies have and the pseudo-monopoly they have in the college admissions process.

Wednesday: We must despise our kids: Our ugly war on teachers must end now

13% of teachers leave the job field every year. Why, you might ask? The rise of charters, the elimination of collective bargaining, and the constant denigration of being failures has turned a once noble profession to one of attrition and defensiveness. The author of the article points to the above examples as reasons why the profession is losing its workforce and warns that reformers are doing more harm than good which we may not see the result of until these children are older.

It is a sad state of affairs, but the author has hit some points that resonate with me. I would be lying if I said that I hadn’t had some tough, demoralizing days in my career that have made me question staying in the profession. The most difficult part is not necessarily financial, however, it is that the acts of the “reformers” have create this stigma around education that has eroded the once strong trust relationship between teachers and parents; a relationship that used to bridge the education of a student from school to home.

Thursday: Feeding and Fertilizing School Athletics

This article was written by the head of the MHSAA, Jack Roberts, and focuses on the importance of expanding opportunities for middle school athletics in order to interscholastic athletics to be successful. The article focuses on two major premises; that 6th graders should be permitted to participate in school sports and that we need to lift the cap on the number of contests permitted at the middle school level. These two factors will help to keep interscholastic sports competitive with outside clubs and groups.

I agree with the authors thoughts on the matter and am concerned about one particular set of comments that had the message that some school administrators believe sports take away from already limited resources. As an assistant principal and athletic director I see everyday, firsthand, the influence of sports on education. Many of the students that roam the halls of my school do so during the day because they know that they won’t be permitted to play their sports if they don’t. Sports teach important lessons about life that cannot be learned elsewhere and having a school-based system ensures that athletics remain educational.

Friday: Bill would get retired teachers back in the classroom

Proposed legislation in both the House and the Senate would allow for the return of retirees to the classroom without hurting their benefits and the hiring of non-certified teachers in areas of need.

I have very mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, there is a very real shortage of teachers in many areas of need and ultimately students lose in this scenario. On the other hand, bringing back retirees brings up a different problem, a generation difference that is exacerbated by the increased demands of today’s teachers. In most other professions, if you have a specialized job that has a limited applicant pool, employers will incentivize the position to make it more attractive. This is where education may be missing the mark. Pardon my crassness, but recycling retired teachers does not solve the long-term need.

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Role of the Legislature in Education

The article linked below was brought to my attention by a teacher and it discusses the legislature writing bills that would change school curriculum. Though the main focus of the article is not about the legislature’s role in education, I cannot help but allow my thoughts to drift toward the role that they play. In this time of common core state standards and smarter balanced assessment the question about federal/state vs. local control needs to be at least considered.

Bill Could Nix Foreign Language Requirements

There is no doubt that the school climate is rapidly changing (as I have talked about previously) and technology is the driving force of that change. I am not opposed to change, but it needs to be well-thought out change. I also feel very strongly that the group that should be responsible for change is the group that is most directly related to enforcing that change. That group that I am referring to does not sit in an elected office in Lansing, but rather it is the front line workers that interact with the learning environment everyday.

With the change part being said, I think that one of the changes schools can start making in regards to curriculum and foreign language is recognizing the importance of “computer language”. While I understand that java and C++ are not the same as a foreign language, it can be argued that a school provided background in that language is just as relevant to the future as is a global language. Regardless of your opinion on this thought, who is best to decide that for the students in our school and district, the people who work with our children or legislators that have not been in a classroom since they attended school?

Just because you attended school at some point does not make you an expert on curriculum. I don’t pretend to make laws just because I took government when I was in high school. Leave the curriculum choices to the local district.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What should the government’s role in curriculum be?

  2. Why should or should not the state intervene in the determination of foreign language requirements?

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