Tag Archives: school

A Hypocrit’s Resolution

I’m guilty, or rather I have been in the past and that is something that I am going to change. What am I guilty of exactly? I am guilty of having my face buried in my phone to a detrimental level. For this new year I resolve to put down my phone when I am bored, waiting, procrastinating, etc. and I am determined to spread that message to the students of my school. I write this now, because I know that if I don’t get it out of my head and out into the world that I will be less apt to make a change.

The thought for this resolution came from a great podcast on How Stuff Works called, “Is computer addiction a thing?” and it evolved in my head into the realization that yes, people are way too focused on their phones; I’m too focused on my phone. In the race to unite people through email, text messaging, and social media people have actually accepted the practice of ignoring those in their immediate vicinity. I think of the cafeteria at my school as a prime example. When most people think about a high school cafeteria at lunch they think about loud, raucous teenagers gouging themselves before heading off to their next class. At the beginning of my career, this was the case. Now, however, when I walk the rows of tables the volume has decreased considerably. They still jam as much food down their throats as possible, but they are doing so one-handed with the other firmly grasping their phones. Most students don’t even notice me as I walk by because their faces are buried in a game or a social account. And there is the kicker; they are in the most loosely structured social environment of their entire school day, where they can sit with whomever they like and talk about whatever they like (within reason) and instead they are focused solely on virtual relationships, while the human relationships suffer.

I fear that the quick development of dependency on cell phones, coupled with the attraction of social media has created a behavioral block that is hindering the development of interpersonal relationships. I did not grow up with a cell phone, in fact, I did not get my first phone until after my first year of college. I grew up in a time when I had to memorize my friend’s phone numbers, and getting to spend time with friends was valuable catching up time. I knew a different way before I became addicted to my phone; our young people have never known a life without immediate access and therefore do not place the same value on a good face-to-face conversation.

When the first automobiles came out, there weren’t any traffic laws. Over time, the rise in popularity in the car lead to congestion and safety concerns. Laws were created and regulations put in place to ensure the safety of not just pedestrians, but the drivers of the vehicles themselves. Cell phones and social media have gone unchecked and unregulated for long enough and the immediate risk is that people are being crippled in the art of communication. It is quite ironic when you think about it; we are now more connected than at any other time in history, yet our ability to communicate is deteriorating over time.

I resolve this new year to put down my phone and have meaningful conversations and relationships. I resolve to spread that word to my students and to lead by example. I’m not abandoning technology, but rather recognizing that when to use it is just as important as when not to use it.

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under education, technology, flipped, education

Ming’s Musings: What I’m reading 10/19-10/23

Monday: Future of Mount Clemens High School football program unclear

Article about the cancellation of the Mt. Clemens football season due to a lack of players. This is a sad article as it reflects a greater issue around the state of declining enrollment sand the slow death of not only programs but schools and districts. This one hits close to home as Mt Clemens is a member of the same athletic conference that my school is in.

Tuesday: The right recipe for transforming Michigan public education

Intriguing opinion piece from the President of the State Board of Education, John Austin, about what is needed to improve Michigan schools. The article points to the declining enrollment of the state of school age children while at the same time the dramatic increase of schools opening (primarily charter and online).

I found myself nodding in agreement throughout this article as it reflects my own personal beliefs about education in the state. Education in Michigan should not be treated like a business where the only the strongest prevail, but rather a service that we cannot risk the results with.

Wednesday: Federal probe of EAA eyes former officials and vendors

The article focuses on the FBI investigation into the EAA, the state created district founded to improve low performing districts. The article is another sad look into the corruption that flows through this district and the lack of oversight. I have never been a fan of the EAA and the amount of power that they have wielded, but I am still sad to read of the greed and selfishness in play that ultimately negatively impacts kids.

Leave a comment

Filed under education

Ming’s Musings: What I’m reading 10/12-10/16

Monday: Obama administration: More support, fewer suspensions for kids who miss too much school

The article expresses a concern on the part of the administration that chronically absent students are being suspended and in some cases expelled. The shocking statistic provided is that 5-7.5 millions students per year have chronic absenteeism, missing 10% or more of the school year. I agree on a certain level with keeping students at school and not suspending them. The suggestions offered of finding the reason for the absence and providing guidance are both things that schools are already doing. This support, however, is also something that has been cut from budgets across the country as belts are tightened. I’ve mentioned before, and I will say it again, we need to address the root of the problems that we observe. It is a near impossible task to provide all that is asked of schools with less dollars and personnel to do so.

Tuesday:  12 Little Known Laws Of Mindfulness (That Will Change Your Life)

This one got caught up in my Pocket account for me to read later, which I finally got around to. I am pick on reading self help articles that give you a different outlook on your life. I liked the 12 suggestions in the article and found one resonate with my particularly well, “When you try to control too much, you enjoy too little”. This one struck a chord with me as I am in a position of control of a lot of elements. This year, with athletics I have tried to give some of that control back to my coaches and am feeling much happier. The other sticking point from the article is that, “Your only reality is THIS MOMENT, right here, right now.” These two takeaways combined have left me with the mentality that I need to try harder to control less and enjoy the now around me. Sometimes when you plan to much you forget to reap the happiness and benefits of that hard work. I will try not to let that happen to me anymore.

Wednesday: Guns in Michigan churches? Bars? Schools? Maybe

Scary legislation has hit the Senate floor that concealed weapons will be allowed in schools, bars, and churches where only open carry had been allowed previously. The article references the recent Community College shooting in Oregon and how firearm carriers DID NOT respond, and how a suspected shoplifter was fired upon in Ann Arbor by someone with a concealed license. These are two prime examples of what could negatively happen as a result of this law passing. Guns have no place in schools.

Thursday: Ex-Detroit principal to plead guilty in bribery probe

Sad article about an embezzlement case taking place in a Detroit high school that has been part of the state reform district of the EAA. It seems that one of the principals is pleading guilty of stealing close to $60k. Articles like this reveal the difficult nature of education in Detroit. The part that bothers me the most is that things like this are happening in the city while they amass more and more debt and do not effectively turn schools around. This combined with the plea from Detroit for the state to bail out their debt at the detriment of all the other districts across the state is troubling at best but sickening at worst.

Friday: World-famous teacher files $1 billion lawsuit against Los Angeles schools to end ‘teacher jail’

Continuing the theme of this week of the sad reality in schools, a nationally awarded and world recognized teacher from LA has filed a class action lawsuit against his former district. The root of the dispute that lead to his dismissal was a joke made in the classroom with his students that was reported and landed him in teacher purgatory, a place they have you go while being investigated. This article typifies the growing rift between society and educators and the rising tensions that are coming about as a result. This is a high profile case, but certainly not the only one out there and shows how closely scrutinized educators are and the unrealistic expectations placed on people that work with children. One could argue that the lack of respect and trust, constant criticism, and governmental tinkering have made every classroom a “teacher jail” of sorts.

Leave a comment

Filed under education

Ming’s Musings: What I’m Reading 9/21-9/25

Monday: Student learning accounts for half of teacher evaluations this year

Local article from my area that talks about the 50% value on student growth for teacher evaluations. This is an especially difficult situation for teachers and the evaluators alike in that the state, through legislation, has said that this is the law, but has not adequately defined what student growth is. To think that 50% of your evaluation is required by law to involve a variable that the state has difficulty defining is a difficult situation for all parties involved. Evaluations are not supposed to be punitive, but rather a measurement of where somebody is and what they can improve on.

Tuesday: Teens Need More Sleep, But Districts Struggle to Shift Start Times

The major point of the article is that school should start later in the day, especially at the high school level. Research points toward high school students optimally starting after 9am, but this poses a logistical issue for many families.

Being someone who has been involved with high school education for 11 years, I can attest to the observation that teenagers have a tough time functioning early in the morning and have noticed how much better those same students do in the afternoon. The article takes the viewpoint, however, that schools are not aware of the benefit of starting later, which is false. Educators are aware of the benefits of the teenage mind starting later in the day, but cost (though we wish it weren’t) is a driving factor in many school decisions. Fundamentally, everything from busing, to teacher contracts, to after school activities (including sports) would need to be changed in order for this to be beneficial. The difficult ask with this type of proposal is that it almost requires an entire community to alter their schedule for the schools and that seems to be too big of a reach in most areas.

Wednesday: Grand Rapids schools teacher layoffs spark evaluation system discussion

Another article, this one out of Grand Rapids, about the effect of teacher evaluations. The article brings up that multiple probationary teachers were released from a district due to not achieving effective status on their evaluation. The troubling part of the article for me is that the point was made that school data is used for student growth for the teachers that teach subjects that are not directly state tested, often times when teachers didn’t teach those students. This is an example of how the failure of the state to define student growth has led to dire outcomes. Another part of the article that was bothersome to me is that one of the board members, that was a former teacher and administrator, claimed a lack of consistency in the year-to-year evaluations citing his own record of being highly effective one year and effective the next. In the education world, as in many other professions, there are up years and down years that are determined by many different factors. It is not a fair claim to say that the evaluator or evaluation system is unjust based on the information provided.

Thursday: Judge rules Ann Arbor school district can ban guns

A short article about Ann Arbor schools and a court case that upheld the right of the school district to ban guns on school property.

I am not against denying anyone their rights that have been granted by our Constitution. With that being said, however, I do not see having guns on school grounds as a good thing. Any gun, whether properly licensed or not, poses a security concern at the very least.

Friday: Five ‘dumb’ things one educator used to think but doesn’t anymore

Interesting take on five topics that have undoubtedly come up in classrooms across the country. “1. School is your job. Just like I have a job and your parents have a job, you too have a job. 2. Algebra teaches you how to think differently. 3. Homework will teach you how to do things you don’t want to do. 4. My strict deadlines are teaching them accountability and responsibility. 5. Difficult/strict teachers help you learn how to deal with those types of people…it’s good for you.

I really enjoyed how the author reflected on his experiences as an educator and challenge the conventional logic above. Anybody that has been in education will tell you that it is cyclical and that there are no new ideas. I don’t believe that this has to be the case if more people challenge why we do what we do. My thoughts on education have changed a great deal over my career and are now reflected in my simple philosophy of creating opportunities. Education should be exciting and learning should be fun while opening doors to areas that otherwise may have been blocked off.

Leave a comment

Filed under education

What I’m Reading 9/14-9/18

Monday: Why borrowing from the ‘best’ school systems sounds good – but isn’t

Interesting article about adapting “successful” models from other locations and trying to put them in place in other places. The author points out that principles of successful systems can be borrowed and used, but not whole policies as these are dependent on the context and culture where the implementation is to occur. This carries particle meaning in the view of the current educational changes that are taking place in our country. It is important to examine all aspects of a successful system and determine why they are successful and what the contributing factors are in that location. A more thoughtful approach is taking bits of successful programs and creating a hybrid model with what your area is already doing well. Good read.

Tuesday: Why Generation Y is unhappy

This one caught my attention as I am a member of Generation Y. The major idea is that our generation has a lot of motivation and drive but has a lack of understanding when it comes to expectations. With a lack of perspective we are ultimately unhappy as our expectations are not met. The lesson to take away is to continue to work hard, appreciate generational differences, and be more content in the moment.

Wednesday: In Education “Change is Inevitable, Growth is Optional” or the 3 Types of Educators

Blog post about educators and their views of change; indicating that there are three. Those views of change (in my own words) are a resistance/wait it out approach, go through the motions and buzzwords out of fear, and to embrace it as a means of advancing one’s self. The last option is the ideal option and the type of educator that, though fearful of change, operates out of that area of being uncomfortable and does what is best for the advancement of student knowledge.

Thursday: More Michigan school districts shedding deficits

Report that states that 40 of 56 school districts that operated out of deficit in the previous year have made positive progress, with 20 of those 40 eliminating their debt. This is an encouraging report about the hard work, dedication, and sacrifices that school districts have made to bring themselves out of debt. While 40 of 56 have made progress, others (Detroit for example) have gone deeper into debt and will be taken over by the Treasury Department.

A major concerning point that is “between the lines” of this article is that school districts have made large cuts from pay reduction, to benefits, to outsourcing of services. Many districts are now at the point that there is nothing else to cut and if the financial situation of the state does not improve there is a grim picture of what that can mean for the future of schools and the retention of quality educators.

Friday: Why are US Teacher so White?

Article had an attention grabbing title and makes mention of the fact that minority teachers has risen from 12 to 17 percent from 1987 to 2012. The article then went into depth about overall teacher attrition, but especially within urban areas which typically employ more minority teachers. The end result of this attrition of minority teachers is that minority students have less role models and examples to look to. I’m not certain of the correlations that the article claims to make but I do think that the point that is made about targeting historically black colleges as well as tribal areas etc to enhance teacher preparation programs is a good idea.

Leave a comment

Filed under education

Goal for the 15-16 School Year

Summer went by fast but with every beginning there must also be an end. The summer has ended and with it my self-imposed break from social media. While I strive to be as connected as possible, the summer was a time for me to be connected with the people that I hold most dear, my family. In order for me to be truly with them, I made the conscious decision to not be connected in blogging and on other social media platforms.

This week marks the return of students to Michigan schools. It also marks the beginning of a new school years’ goals. The primary goal that I am setting forth for myself this year is to be more informed. To accomplish this goal my intention is two-fold; first, I intend to read one article per school day. This may take the form of an online article or in one of the journals that I receive. The second fold of the goal is to reflect on that reading by posting a blog entry per week. My hope is that I can accomplish this before Sunday of each week, but alas, the weekend will likely be used at times to catch up.

The articles and thoughts on those articles will be posted to my Michigan Education Issues website as well throughout the year.

Here are the articles I read this week:

Tuesday: Bills reveal Snyder’s Plan Schools Plan: Increased Oversight

Governor Snyder plans on addressing the needs of under performing and financially stressed districts with the hiring of additional layers of bureaucracy. To address the needs of “failing” districts, he is proposing legislation that would “education managers” that would have universal control over both traditional public as well as charter schools that are deemed to be part of empowerment zones.

My personal thoughts on this are that a government appointed official that is appointed, not hired, by Lansing to be the CEO and superintendent of a school district is not the answer for struggling schools. Until we examine the reasons why schools (and students) are struggling and work to provide support in those areas, schools will continue to fail. Additional oversight is not a step in the right direction, but rather an attempt to do something, be it misguided.

Wednesday: Late Again?

Insightful article written by a college professor about what motivates students to show up on time for class. The author reveals that gimmicks do not carry much weight with students and that public shaming has a larger effect. This flies a bit in the face of convention as educators are geared more toward nurturing than shaming of students. Another big takeaway is that students want to be engaged and not lectured to, a trend that has been developing more and more in my time in education.

Thursday: Memorizing is out, thinking like a scientist is in 

This Detroit Free Press article focused on the new Michigan Science Standards. Though there is some resistance about the new standards, in the same vein as the Common Core State Standards and in the name of a loss of local control, there are many positives pointed out by the author. The article recognizes the importance of the need for standards that require students to take the lead in their own learning rather than memorizing or following step-by-step instructions. The PROCESS of critical thinking is more important than perfection in the end product.

Friday: A Referee’s Take on Blown Calls, Game Control and Fans’ Misconceptions

This Sports Illustrated article from December of 2014 was passed along to me at an MHSAA Athletic Director’s Update meeting. The article provides clever insight from a high ranking hockey official about the role of referees in athletics. The major point of the article was that referees cannot control a game, but rather they only make calls when the play falls outside the rules of the game. The responsibility of control in a game falls on the players, coaches, and parents. This is an important lesson for coaches, players, and parents as it puts the emphasis on them to control and learn from their actions rather than assigning blame to the officials.

1 Comment

Filed under education

Envisioning Schools of Tomorrow

Schools do not look the same as they did 100 years ago; nor should they. The buildings in which we educate our youth should change as the needs of society change. These buildings should change both structurally and intellectually. In my previous two posts I discussed my educational philosophy and the need to shift the focus of learning. What follows is my vision of what schools in the future will look like.

The major premises that my vision for the future of schools are based on:

  • Today’s school buildings do offer some “unwritten” advantages that pay dividends in personal development of students
  • Learning through the use of technology is not going away, but does not replace the value of a good teacher
  • Knowing where to find information and what to do with that information has become a higher priority than the information itself
  • A school, and education in general, is a means of creating an opportunity for something better.

There are inherent advantages in schools as they are currently configured. They are a microcosm of society, for better or for worse, and provide a relatively safe environment for young people to learn the roles of society…how to interact with others, forming relationships, conflict resolution, etc. These lessons that exist outside of the curriculum are fully missed through online education.

That, however, brings me to the second bullet point, technology is not going away. As a high school administrator I have seen students leave my school to jump on the bandwagon of online school. Unfortunately, the transition from all brick and mortar to exclusively online is a difficult one for many students. My vision for the future is a blended effect across the board. Schools would become much more wired than they are now with a much more liberal plan for electronics usage.

With a more blended environment it is going to be important for schools of the future to provide the proper structure for success. I envision a slew of new classes developing that will teach basic tech uses, proper research and citation process, digital citizenship (and digital presence), time management, focus strategies, unplugging sessions, etc. All of these new classes would become a mandatory part of the curriculum that would provide the tools needed to construct a future education in preparation for life in the “real-world”.

All of these factors combined bring me to my final vision for future education; information gathering and usage will be measured and will lead to greater flexibility and choice for students. My radical twist for the future of education is the breaking down of the current class length requirement currently set at semester or trimester and instead a focus on standard proficiency. Through blended learning students would be able to complete courses early and move on to other areas of interest faster or conversely have the ability to spend more time in areas of need. Grades, in essence, would no longer be the assessment of student learning, but rather, students would need to be able to use the material learned in class and apply it in order to prove proficiency. Standard proficiency would lead to advancement and diving into material at a deeper level.

Schools of the future will look different. My vision for schools creates choice and eliminates the students that “know how to play the game”. By blending learning and shifting our focus, schools will be a place of choice and opportunity that will prepare students for what lies ahead.

1 Comment

Filed under #miched, education